After all the hubbub concerning the AV last week a new debate has arisen over a different system of submission. Once again, it is a debate that has been bouncing back and forth for years, it concerns the method by which prospective undergraduates apply to university.

The issue surrounds claims from experts at the University of Warwick that the current system of applying to university not with confirmed but predicted grades is unfair and discriminates against poorer and disadvantaged groups of students. This is said to be even more pressing now that the top cap of tuition fees has been raised to the infamous £9,000 per year.

The main section of students that get most penalised by this current system is 'the late developer'. Usually educated in a state school, these people are those who manage to pull the tricks out of the bag on their last exams and manage to convert borderline Bs to As and As to A*s. The end result is someone going to a university that they are overqualified for.

The Department for Business, Skills and Innovation and the Sutton Trust has also published a report stating that thousands of people were missing out on university places which they have the A level grades for because of the current system.

A worrying issue, but how do we feel in hindsight, after attending university and coming out the other end as a graduate? Did it effect many of us so negatively that the whole system needs a rehaul? The alternative would mean huge increases in admin costs for universities who will have to process all their applications in a much shorter space of time. Is it worth it? Let us know.