So you've donned that silly cap and gown and got the awkward picture to prove it, but what's next? Whether it's an internship, a shiny new job or spending most of your time applying for them (interspersed with Netflix viewing), here's what the average graduate has to look forward to...
You attend more interviews than you ever have in your entire life - and you start to get pretty good at 'em.
Your social media feeds become a minefield of FOMO - why is everyone you know riding an elephant?
With cheap student nights a thing of the past, your alcohol tolerance goes waaay down.
Cultivating friendships requires a bit more effort than occasionally rolling up to a lecture or bonding in the smoking area.
In fact, socialising in general means more effort, and having to synchronise the diaries of people with disturbingly adult commitments ('sorry, I've got my pilates class that night').
You realise that making your own lunch for work will save you a ridiculous amount of money. Every day you spend approximately £5000000 in Pret.
Time starts flying by at an alarming rate. Before you know it, you'll be feeling as 22 as T-Swift.
You have the odd existential crisis, wondering what on earth you should be doing with your life.
You probably have an expensive gym membership burning a hole in your wallet.
Nostalgia for the simpler days of uni will run HIGH, with the waft of a Jagerbomb enough to bring a tear to your eye.
A lie-in is anything beyond about 7am, and your natural state is one of exhaustion.
Well-meaning relatives frequently question why you're bothering with an internship and don't have a 'real' job yet.
You regularly wonder whose bright idea it was to make the working week last FIVE whole days.
You're forced to master the art of communal kitchen small-talk.
That 'Friday Feeling' goes from merely being an annoying hashtag to something you actually feel.
Your idea of a great time involves a lot less going out, and a lot more Netflix.
Depending on the proximity to pay day, your attitude to money veers wildly between Scrooge levels of saving and fuck-it levels of spending.
You realise that TV shows like Friends have sold you a lie - it turns out adult life involves a lot less hanging out at coffee houses, and a lot more still living with your parents.
But even still...