Aldi Interview Questions & Answers

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Difficulty rating 6 / 10

Interview experience

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  • Aldi - Retail Industrial Placement

    3.8571/5 | Interview date: April 2015 | Job offer? Not yet |

    Was this helpful? Yes

    Sectors: Retail

    Difficulty rating 60.0 / 100

    Interview process

    The video interview consisted of about five questions. Your camera and mic are set up online and you are then ready to go.

    There are a couple of informative videos, showing what to expect, how to dress (joggers on the bottom if you like but smart for the camera).

    A practice question is given, and when you are ready you proceed to the formal interview. Each question is shown, then a countdown timer starts and on '0' the recording starts. I can't remember all the questions but these are the ones I can

    What is the most interesting thing you have learned about Aldi from your research?

    What qualities do you think the placement will bring out in you?

    I'm sorry I really can't remember the rest

    That's about it really, you answer the questions, and receive a confirmation email.

    Most difficult question

    What is the most interesting thing you have learnt about Aldi from your research?

    This was hard for me as I hadn't done much research so had to really think on the spot.

    Interview tips

    Really be yourself. Obviously you need to tailor your answers to what the company want to hear, but Aldi will be looking at your videos and if you don't smile/laugh a bit/show off some personality it will be very hard to get excited by your answers.

    Experiences at the assessment centre

    N/A

    Interview steps

    Interviews

    • Phone
    • 1:1
    • Group / Panel
    • Senior Management
    • Video

    Tests

    • Numerical
    • Personality
    • Verbal reasoning
    • Psychometric

    Other

    • Assessment centre
    • Group excercise
    • Background check
    • Presentation
    • Competency based questions

    Rating the interview

    • How would you rate the pre-attendance information? 5/5
    • How well was the interview organised? 5/5
    • What was your overall impression of the organisation? 4/5
    • What was your overall impression of the selection process? 4/5
    • Did the interview reflect the overall values / culture of the organisation? 3/5
    • Would you recommend this company to a friend? 3/5
    • Did you want the role following your interview? 3/5
  • Aldi - Graduate Area Manager Opportunities

    4.4286/5 | Interview date: March 2015 | Job offer? Yes |

    Was this helpful? Yes

    Sectors: Management

    Difficulty rating 60.0 / 100

    Interview process

    The first stage of the application process was an online application, which included academic qualifications, employment history and some general questions.
    I then was invited to an group interview/ assessment center day. There were approx 12 of us on the day, overlooked by two senior members of Aldi. We had to give a timed, 2 min presentation introducing ourselves to the group. We were then given a problem solving scenario and split into groups to debate the outcome under timed conditions, and then report back our decision and why. We had to give a second 2 min presentation on a topic of interest, followed by paper-based, maths, verbal and logical reasoning tests. It all lasted around 2 hours.
    I think the key here is to strike a good balance between being able to lead a team but also still be part of the team/ not be too overbearing.

    I received a letter about a month later inviting me for a one-on-one interview with the Regional Director, and to complete an online personality test prior to the interview. This interview was more focused on me as a person: what I could bring to the company; how my degree was relevant; hardest decision I've ever had to make; where do I see myself in 10 years? Etc. I was also asked to complete a 10 min task to chronologically order the stages involved arranging a meeting (I presume to test my organisational/reasoning skills).
    I received a letter about a week later offering me the job :)

    Most difficult question

    "How does your degree equip you for working in a discount-retail environment?"

    Interview tips

    We were told on multiple occasions at the assessment center that the company looks for a very specific 'type' of person; that they know exactly what they are looking for and it's 'very niche'. So it's hard to say really what they're looking for. The best advice I can give is to be confident and approachable, but also remember that a manager is a team player, as well as a team leader, so try not to be overly domineering in group tasks.
    Neither the assessment day or the one-on-one interviews were particularly intimidating, everyone was very friendly. So embrace the experience, and just give it your all.

    Experiences at the assessment centre

    There were about 12 of us at the assessment center, overlooked by two senior members of Aldi.
    - We first had to give a 2 min presentation introducing ourselves. This was timed, which was important as here they want to see not only how confident you are in addressing an audience, but also that you are able to sustain the audience for a relative period of time and that you have a fair idea about timings. Also be sure to pay good attention to other people, because the position is all about being able to work well with others (i.e being interested and listening to what they have to say.)
    - We were then split into two groups for a problem solving exercise. The scenario was that we had a life raft which could only fit 5 out of the 6 of us, and so our task was to decide who to leave behind. We were each assigned a character whose personality we had to assume. This again was timed. I think the key here was to be able to give a reasoned argument as to your ideas and be subtly persuasive, but not overbearing. (Try to strike a balance between giving your ideas and encouraging others/ listening to their ideas). I was outnumbered, but it was important that I noticed this and compromised with the group.
    - We had to give a second 2 min presentation (which we had a minute to prepare for) on something we were passionate about. This again was testing the same skills as the first presentation. Try and talk about something that someone else is not likely to talk about- perhaps a hobby, a sport etc as it will keep people engaged. But stick to something you know plenty about, because this will help your confidence. I'd advise using the minute to plan, to focus on a structure to what you're going to say, so that the presentation is clear.
    - There were then three short, paper-based, tests we had to complete. A maths, verbal reasoning and a logical reasoning test. Each was about 10-15 questions and timed at approx 5 mins each. These were fairly basic, but you can't use a calculator so brush up on basic maths (i.e. fractions/percentages/ratios/basic multiplication etc)
    - Finally we were given the opportunity to ask any questions. Try to go prepared with 3/4 questions, just in case someone else beats you to it. Be careful to do your research; don't ask things which you could find the answer to yourself on google. But do try and ask something, as this gets you noticed and shows your enthusiasm for the company.

    Interview steps

    Interviews

    • Phone
    • 1:1
    • Group / Panel
    • Senior Management
    • Video

    Tests

    • Numerical
    • Personality
    • Verbal reasoning
    • Psychometric

    Other

    • Assessment centre
    • Group excercise
    • Background check
    • Presentation
    • Competency based questions

    Rating the interview

    • How would you rate the pre-attendance information? 1/5
    • How well was the interview organised? 5/5
    • What was your overall impression of the organisation? 5/5
    • What was your overall impression of the selection process? 5/5
    • Did the interview reflect the overall values / culture of the organisation? 5/5
    • Would you recommend this company to a friend? 5/5
    • Did you want the role following your interview? 5/5
  • Aldi - Graduate Area Manager Opportunities

    3.8571/5 | Interview date: February 2015 | Job offer? No |

    Was this helpful? Yes

    Sectors: Retail

    Difficulty rating 40.0 / 100

    Interview process

    I received an email in December 2014 from Aldi telling me I was successful with their initial CV check, and was asked to attend a group interview with their at their North-West headquarters in Neston. I arrived with plenty of time to spare and slowly more and more people filtered into the waiting room. Eventually the twelve of us were invited through into a board room - very corporate looking - and we sat round a table waiting for our interviewer, who ended up being their managing director of that region.

    When he arrived he seemed relatively laid back and informal. He began by asking us to go round, each briefly telling him our name, where we are at university (if we were), when our degree will be completed, and to explain in 30 seconds why we had applied for this role. This seemed simple enough, giving us an opportunity to speak directly with him, and I found the more relaxed speakers came across the best. Some people seemed very wooden and rehearsed which was surprising.

    After this brief introduction he explained that this would be not be a conventional assessment centre, and the interview would proceed with him asking some questions about the company, before giving us a chance to ask questions and invoke discussion.

    He asked simple things like the history of the company, whether it is privately or publicly owned, how the company is split (Aldi North and Aldi South), and about the produce they supply to the customers, etc. These question were fairly simple for those who had done their research, but it also meant that those who weren't sure on some answers weren't caught out given they were open questions to the group, and plenty of people were fighting to get their voices heard.

    This took 45 minutes to an hour, before asking if we had any questions. He explained that this was a tough job and we need to ask our questions now so each person can assess whether Aldi is right for them, as well as whether they are right for Aldi. This process took another hour (so 2 hours in total) and those people who were calm, collected and asked good, honest questions appeared to be the most applicable for the job.

    I heard back within a few weeks and was asked back for a second, 1-on-1 interview with the same manager. This process began, however, with a 15 minute assessment on basic mathematical reasoning, verbal reasoning and logical deduction. For example there were questions which followed the structure 'in a museum, if exhibition A is on a floor above exhibition B, and exhibition C is above exhibition D, but C is below A, and if exhibition E was moved from above B to below C, then what exhibition is on the 4th level?' They were basic questions, and if one used a piece of scrap paper then all the questions were deducible and answerable.

    I was then lead upstairs to the interview room and met with the managing director once again. This interview was more personal, and it felt somewhat relaxed as he simply wanted to get to know me. He began by asking me to run him from the age of 0 up to the age of 21. So this was easy, telling him about my family, where I grew up, went to school, etc. Adding in relevant things about my work experience, etc.

    He would ask question as I went through, and asked me questions at the end. None about the company, just personal questions which were easy to answer. Once again he finished by asking if I had any questions for him. There was an emphasis on making sure I knew everything I needed to know, so ask as many questions as you can think of!

    I received an email the next day telling me I had been unsuccessful, but they declined to give any feedback which seemed odd given I had met this man twice already.

    Overall the interview process was wide-ranging, giving you and them the best chance to get to know each other.

    Most difficult question

    No classic interview questions.

    Simple business questions like 'Why might it be better to be a privately owned business than a publicly owned one?'

    Interview tips

    The position appeals to a lot of people for the money and the perks, but as I reached the latter stages of the process I realised the job may only suit a select few. So go ahead with the process but be aware that the position at the end of it will be extremely hard work, and don't expect to have your hand held. I realised when I was eventually rejected that I was relieved.

    The company is all about efficiency, and that is what you ought to expect; an efficient, corporate organisation. This may not suit everybody.

    Experiences at the assessment centre

    The assessment centre was termed an 'assessment centre', but in fact it was a basic question and answer scenario; not at all what I was expecting.

    Interview steps

    Interviews

    • Phone
    • 1:1
    • Group / Panel
    • Senior Management
    • Video

    Tests

    • Numerical
    • Personality
    • Verbal reasoning
    • Psychometric

    Other

    • Assessment centre
    • Group excercise
    • Background check
    • Presentation
    • Competency based questions

    Rating the interview

    • How would you rate the pre-attendance information? 2/5
    • How well was the interview organised? 5/5
    • What was your overall impression of the organisation? 4/5
    • What was your overall impression of the selection process? 4/5
    • Did the interview reflect the overall values / culture of the organisation? 5/5
    • Would you recommend this company to a friend? 2/5
    • Did you want the role following your interview? 5/5

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