This week as part of our #yousayTuesday question we asked you How you thought your degree would allow you to pursue your dream career. This is a question that graduates/students ask themselves before and during university. How will this academic work put me in good stead in the real world? Well easily...you've just got to phrase it right. Here are the 5 ways to use your degree to get that dream job.

1.Skills to pay the bills

At university all degrees will provide you with skills that are valued in the work place. Whether they're directly related or not, but even if you've studied a traditionally academic degree like History or Maths, you'll have first rate analytical and numerate skills to bring to the company.

2. You're in the know...

Often graduates do not make much of their knowledge around the subject they studied. As erudite and intellectual masters on their subject, it is likely that graduates will want to pursue careers on what specialised in, employers will be impressed if you can relate this to a role. If a graduate is upto date on the latest trends, developments or writings in Sociology or Sports Science employers will want to see this shine through in applications and covering letters when it is relevant.

3. Exhibit A)...

It's all very well talking the talk, but when it comes to physically showing them what you can you've got stacks of the stuff. It could be that Art History dissertation that has made you a quasi-expert on Bauhaus and the city or a module you took that would provide you with evidence for why you are an intellectual powerhouse.

4. Not what you know, but...

If you look at your lectures and think they are just fusty, old lecturers in their ivory towers, look again. Chatting to lecturers or even emailing them for advice you would be surprised by the contacts that they might have. Especially in subjects like Law or Accountancy, it could lead to advantageous work experience.

5. Born to do it...

If you've studied a particular subject for three years and invest a shed load of cash, it would be foolish for it not to be a passion of yours. And you should let employers know. You would not study Business or Economics unless you had a genuine interest in it. But don't make yourself sound desperate about it.
Graduates are often panicked about what they can offer employers and by saying all they've got to offer is there degree. Obviously, supplementing academic achievement with work experience is the divine duo, but degrees provide graduates with a wealth of skills and experience all by themselves.